I figured the best way to kick off this blog would be to open a full box of SOME kind of hockey cards – since I am trying to just get my collection off the ground. What better way to do that than opening some of last year’s least valuable Upper Deck sets!

The rational behind selecting UD Victory 2010-2011 was pretty simple:

  • It has been almost a decade since I’ve had to delicately open packs of sports cards – so the best way to practice was to open a box of value priced cards!
  • I wanted to find a few rookie cards to have as a “starting point” as the rest of the collection grew. Victory from that year promised a 1:2 chance to find a rookie card in a pack. With 11 packs, I had to find at least five (according to odds). That way I could see if these guys would be hits or misses as time went on.
  • They were VERY cheap.
  • It goes back to my roots from collecting baseball cards – getting the simplest pack of cards in hopes of finding names I might have known.
  • I never have opened a full box of cards before. It was a secret fantasy as a kid to own a card shop, and to open packs of cards whenever I wanted. This was, in some ways, a dream come true to open a full box of cards (now that I can actually afford them, instead of the $3 allowance I got when I was five.)
So the small blue covered box with the injured Sidney Crosby was carefully torn open…
I knew there wasn’t a very good chance to get any “special” insert cards. The back of each pack taunted me with what seemed like impossible odds for my small box. I knew rookie cards or Gamebreaker/Stars of the Game cards would be in each pack, so I at least knew that I’d get a few “different” cards. But the parallel cards taunted me with anything from 1:36 to 1:1440. But this is what I wanted – that feeling of hope that maybe one of the packs would contain something amazing.
I rummaged through each pack, carefully reteaching myself not to bend the corners of the cards. I’d stack them in little piles resting on top of each opened wrapper – separating the 1:2 cards onto the side to see what kind of fun things I’d get. Near the end, I finally got a card I didn’t expect: a lowly gold parellel regular card. The odds of getting one were pretty decent at 1:36, but I still triumphantly placed the card on the top of the “inserts” pile.
At the end of my card-opening training program, I sat with a large stack of regular cards, and twelve insert cards. “Not bad,” I thought to myself. “That’s one more than I was guaranteed to get!”
Here is the breakdown of the general card types in the box:
A breakdown of this Box Break's contents.

There were a few teams who were not represented in any of the eleven packs.

_______________
Highlights:
  • Evgeni Malkin made himself known by appearing in both a Stars of the Game and Game Breakers card.
  • There were three SotG and three Game Breakers cards in this box.
  • There were five rookie cards (Rookie Breakdown)
  • The lone Gold Parallel was Daniel Alfredsson.
  • There wasn’t a single duplicate card.
Game Breakers:
  • Evgeni Malkin
  • Drew Doughty
  • Alexander Ovechkin
Stars of the Game:
  • Evgeni Malkin
  • Carey Price
  • Henrik Zetterberg
Rookie Cards (read more here):
  • Nick Bonino
  • Evan Oberg
  • Mike Duco
  • Cody Almond
  • Philip Larsen
All in all, I felt comfortable breaking open my first box. While it wasn’t a super exciting set to hope for cards in, it still was good experience to get me ready for future packs if I ever decide to drop $100 for a hobby box. I was content with the cards I got, bringing in three Sabres regular cards, a few potential rookies, and the gold Alfredsson card.
Now to get ready for some potentially more exciting packs later this week…
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One response »

  1. […] of cards, regardless of how good (or likely to play) the player is. As previously mentioned in the Blog Kickoff Box: “UD Victory 2010-2011″ article, there were five rookie cards inside the UD Victory box that I broke […]

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